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CARPE TRAVEL WINE 101:
GET TO KNOW THE GRAPES

GETTING TO KNOW

Albarino Wine

Albarino​ (alba-reen-yo) is a light-bodied yet high quality white grape that originated in Northwest Spain (Galicia). Today it is mainly grown in Spain and Portugal.

The Albarino grape produces extremely mouth-watering fruit-forward wine with high acid. As a result it is very aromatic and has a higher level of terpenes and thoils. Thoils are found in cooler climate growing regions and provide an intense melon or ruby red grapefruit aroma. The nose has aromas of lemons, limes, pear, grapefruit, honeysuckle, nectarine, occasionally orange zest, beeswax, wet gravel and Thai basil.

Flavors include stone and tropical fruits like white peach, apricot, melon, and pineapple.

Photo provided by Canva.

The Albarino grape produces extremely mouth-watering fruit-forward wine with high acid. As a result it is very aromatic and has a higher level of terpenes and thoils. Thoils are found in cooler climate growing regions and provide an intense melon or ruby red grapefruit aroma. The nose has aromas of lemons, limes, pear, grapefruit, honeysuckle, nectarine, occasionally orange zest, beeswax, wet gravel and Thai basil.

Fun Fact

Albariño vines are some of the world’s oldest at 300+ years old. That’s not too far off the world’s oldest cultivated grape in North Carolin – the 400-year-old Mothervine on Roanke Island.

WHERE TO FIND THE Albarino Grape

Well known regions for Albarino include Rias Baixas, (Spain) and Minho (Portugal). More Albarino is coming out of  the Central Coast in California since the varietal is well-suited for maritime climates and is always planted near the ocean. (Watch for Albarino from Southern Oregon and Washington State.) 

SPAIN

Rías Baixas, Spain is known as the capital of Albariño production where 90% of the vineyards are Albarino grapes.

PORTUGAL

In Minho, Portugal the “Alvarinho” is used to make Vinho Verde (slightly green-tinted spitzy white wine).

Other Names to Look for When Exploring Albarino Wine

  • Albarina
  • Alvarinho
  • Galeguinho
  • Alvarin Blanco
  • Azal Blanco
  • Alvarinha
  • Galego

When is the Right Mood for Albarino Wine?

Beach
Wine

Park
Sipping

BBQ

Cookout

Veggies


Summertime

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HOW TO ENJOY ALBARINO WINE

ALBARINO FOOD PAIRING

Albarino is a crowd-pleasing wine. On the palate, the wine supports a variety of food textures. It’s high acidity and slight bitterness serves as a palate cleanser. It pairs well with aromatic herbs and light dishes. Enjoy Albarnio paired with seafood. Albarino wines pairs best with flaky whitefish, Monkfish, Cod, Salmon, Chicken, Melon Fruit Salad, Oysters, Clams, Trout Dip, Butter Drenched Lobster, Butter Lettuce, Parmesan Cheese, Thai, Indian and Caribbean food.

PRACTICAL TIPS FOR ALBARINO WINE

Glassware: White wine glasses. 

Shelf life: Consume Albarino within about one year after harvest but does have a shelf-life of two-years. I personally would not hold on to this wine – consume it when purchased as it does not typically process well in the bottle and can fall apart and taste stale. However, there are some wineries producing Albarino with great aging potential. So, it can and does happen, it’s just not the norm.

Bottle Prices: The average bottle cost is $20.

Albarino WINE RECOMMENDATIONS

Looking for Albarino recommendations? Here are a few suggested sips.

Maia Parish

Carpe Travel collaborated with Maia Parish to compile the grape varietal overviews. Maia Parish is an award-winning events producer, sommelier, wine judge, and media consultant. She lives in Denver, Colorado and likes to eat copious amounts of food. You can find her here www.linktr.ee/thewinemistress.